Playing God

  •  April 6, 2020


Playing God

Without a heart in our chest, we are just moving images. With people sculptures, Australian artist work makes one wonder how we value form, but we may be forgetting the essence.

From appearances, Sam Jinks understands. With a career in television and film, working with special effects, his specialty has always been illusion. As a result of an impressive talent, his work went out of the small screen to win the public in halls and galleries around the world. Like Art Stage Singapore - recently, the international art fair has dedicated a pavilion especially to exhibit its pieces.

Although the end result is close to the divine, Jinks does not use clay. His hyperrealistic sculptures start from miniatures, which involves up to four attempts per piece. On the chosen scale an iron frame is assembled, such as a skeleton, which is then filled with silicone, fiberglass, resin and calcium carbonate. The next step is dedicated to the application of human hair, wire by wire. Skin painting is the last part.


In the end, we are faced with a portrait of our real condition of vulnerability. The message is dubious, making us reflect on both loss and the natural cycle of things. From all this we understand that, in a way, those who live in appearance are museums. If your branch is not the sculpture, drop the mask. And look at life (and body) changes in a natural way.

Playing God

With Human Hair, Sam Jinks Finishes Sculpture


Playing God

Resin, fiberglass, silicone and synthetic bone are some of the ingredients that take shape.

Playing God


“The Hanging Man”: The result is impressive and exposes our vulnerability.

Playing God

Artwork contemplates and exposes our life cycle

Playing God

For Jinks, the new and the old are just rubber and paint

Playing God

Who lives in appearance is museum - if not your case, drop the mask

Follow in the following video the meticulous process of creation of the artist.

Paramore: Playing God [OFFICIAL VIDEO] (April 2020)


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